Headwall Photonics Blog

Headwall Names Tom Breen as Director of Global Sales

Posted by Christopher Van Veen on Fri, Jun 06, 2014

Growth Markets Require Solid Industry Background Across Commercial and Defense Markets 

Fitchburg, MA – June 6, 2014 – With a rapid expansion of international business, Headwall Photonics announced today that Tom Breen has joined the Company as Director of Global Sales. Tom brings with him significant experience across many of the end-user markets served by Headwall. He will be responsible for managing Headwall’s growing worldwide sales activities and strategic opportunities for hyperspectral and Raman imagers as well as the Company’s OEM integrated spectral instrumentation.

Tom BreenPrior to joining Headwall, Tom held executive leadership positions at UTC Aerospace Systems where he was responsible for sales and business development of airborne and hand-held products. He also served as Vice President of Sales and Marketing for General Dynamic’s Axsys Technology Division in Nashua, New Hampshire. Other senior management positions at L-3 Communications, BAE Systems, and Lockheed Martin provided Tom with the background that will allow Headwall to grow its business in the hyperspectral imaging market.

“We are thrilled that Tom has joined our team,” said Headwall CEO David Bannon. “His background complements our commercial growth plans seamlessly and he will be a terrific asset in tackling a market that is experiencing very robust growth. Tom has had significant success in building high performance sales teams coupled with exceptional customer relationships.”

“I am very excited to be joining Headwall at a period of tremendous momentum for the Company and the industry,” said Tom. “As a leading supplier of spectral instrumentation, Headwall is uniquely poised to expand and deliver hyperspectral sensors and OEM instruments for remote sensing and in-line applications.”

Headwall’s award-winning Hyperspec and Raman imagers are used in commercial and military airborne applications, in advanced machine-vision systems, for document and artifact care, for plant genomics, in medicine and biotechnology, and for remote sensing. A unique differentiator for the Company is Headwall’s patented all-reflective, aberration-corrected optical technology that is fundamental to every system it produces.

Tom is a published author, with numerous works produced for IEEE, SPIE, and AAAE. Tom’s educational background includes MBA and BSEE degrees from Northeastern University in Boston.

Tags: hyperspectral, Headwall Photonics, Headwall, Tom Breen, Sales

Bone-Dating Using Hyperspectral Imaging!

Posted by Christopher Van Veen on Thu, Aug 29, 2013

Headwall recently completed some fascinating demonstration work on behalf of the Conservation Manager and several colleagues at London's Natural History Museum.

One of the hallmarks of hyperspectral imaging is its ability to non-destructively and non-invasively collect an invaluable amount of spatial and spectral data from any sort of reflected matter within the field of view. In commerce and environmental studies, hyperspectral imaging is a valuable and well-known tool that can ‘see’ the unseen.

composite bonesForensics is another exciting area of research. Take 300,000-year-old Neanderthal human bones, for example. Or a 300-year-old snake skin. Or a 400-year-old book of poems. Here you see two bones within the field of view of Headwall's VNIR starter kit. The smaller one is 'only' 200 years old; the larger is 300,000 years old. But the beauty of hyperspectral sensing is that it can classify and compare specimens like these with a tremendous amount of precision, yielding a level of scientific analysis that museums and 'collection-care' experts crave. The demonstration that Headwall performed was an exciting opportunity to show off not only the capabilities of the sensor, but also the capabilities of our new Hyperspec III software. The Conservation Manager was extremely excited with the results of the demonstration. He even remarked that his museum would like to embrace and move forward with the opportunity to be a 'Centre of Excellence for Hyperspectral Imaging,' with Headwall as its sponsor.

Spectral ‘fingerprints’ contain a tremendous amount of useful data, and hyperspectral instruments can see these fingerprints and then extract meaningful data regarding the chemical composition of anything within the field of view. More helpful still, these instruments work in tandem with known spectral libraries that allow a very high degree of selectivity and discrimination. If you know the spectral fingerprint associated with a particular chemical, you can reference it against the hyperspectral data cube coming from the sensor. That fingerprint, once found, very often will be a ‘predictor’ of something else. Disease conditions in crop trees, for example, or the presence of certain inks or pigments on a document or artifact. That’s why precision agriculture and document verification are two other common deployment areas for hyperspectral imaging.

Tags: hyperspectral, Natural History Museum, Headwall, bone-dating, forensics, spectral analysis