Headwall Photonics Blog

Hyperspectral Imaging - Next Generation Machine Vision Platform for Food Safety and Quality

Posted by David Bannon on Tue, Jun 26, 2012

Bosoon Park, author of this blog entry, works as an Agricultural Engineer on behalf of the USDA in Georgia. He has done extensive research on hyperspectral and Raman imaging as it applies to food inspection and agriculture. Author of numerous published papers on the subject, Bosoon will be co-presenting a discussion on hyperspectral imaging at the annual conference of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers to be held in Dallas July 30 through August 2.

USDA At USDA, our work revolves around making sure that the foods we harvest and eat are safe, high quality, and healthy. Our mission is twofold: ensuring and improving the safety of food and feed, and ensuring and improving the quality and economic value of food and crops.

There are very important inspection steps between ‘farm’ and ‘fork,and the USDA invests considerable time looking at new technologies that can help. Hyperspectral & Raman imaging (both imaging spectroscopy techniques) can provide valuable inspection data based on the chemical composition of agricultural products that traditional machine vision systems cannot provide. 

During the past decade, USDA has worked with companies such as Headwall Photonics to develop hyperspectral technologies for in-line food safety inspection. Our work focuses on contaminant detection during in-line processing, which the Hyperspec Inspector allows us to do. Our researchers are expanding hyperspectral imaging technology to rapidly detect foodborne pathogens at a microscopic level.  Hyperspectral imaging has tremendous potential for the food industry in terms of safety inspection and quality control by analyzing spatial and spectral characteristics of agricultural products.  We are also exploring handheld hyperspectral instruments fully integrated with operating software for field use.

Raman spectrometers will also detect foodborne pathogens since their scattering phenomena respond very well to particular laser-lighting sources. USDA researchers have proved the concept to identify bacterial species and foodborne bacterial serotypes with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This is an emerging area of focused research for improved food safety.

In an effort to educate and inform, several of us from USDA are preparing a short course on ‘hyperspectral imaging’ at the upcoming American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) conference July 30-August 2 in Dallas. Thanks to help from Headwall Photonics in commercializing and economizing the technology, we’re able to research and test hyperspectral and Raman instruments so that they can become mainstream across food-processing industries ranging from poultry to specialty crops.

Tags: hyperspectral imaging, hyperspectral, Sensors, SWIR, food processing, agriculture, Raman, USDA, plant phenotyping, Raman imaging