Headwall Photonics Blog

Headwall Remote Sensing Capabilities Seen “Down Under”

Posted by David Bannon on Wed, Jul 31, 2013

melbourneThis past week, Headwall remote sensing team finished a productive week Down Under at the International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS) in Melbourne, Australia.  The conference, organized by the IEEE, comprises a ‘Who’s Who’ across the global remote sensing community. But curiously absent were representatives from the United States, probably reflecting the topic du jour: sequestration. Imagine holding a geo-spatial and remote sensing conference and no one from NASA was able to attend?

From an international perspective, we observed tremendous interest from customers looking to gain spectral capability for their manned aircraft and also surprising interest from organizations looking to buy “all-inclusive” UAV configurations that include the Micro-Hyperspec imaging spectrometer, a GPS/INS unit, a lightweight IGARSS 2013 Boothembedded processor, and an suite of application software. This complete airborne package was a big hit at IGARSS because while users have good grasp on the benefits of airborne hyperspectral, they need help making it work in particular application.  Two very nice UAVs on display at IGARSS created a lot of buzz in the Headwall booth. Although Headwall doesn’t make the UAV platform, we make them do some pretty amazing things within the realm of hyperspectral remote sensing. That message came through loud and clear, as our stand at IGARSS was phenomenally busy from the start right through the end.

A bit further up in altitude were visitors interested in hyperspectral remote sensing from space. A major point of interest throughout the conference was a demonstrated need for cost effective, space-qualified hyperspectral sensor payloads.  With most of the world’s planned remote sensing missions being delayed for budget reasons, VNIR (380-1000nm) and SWIR (900-2500nm) space-qualified imagers are hot commodities. This is an area that Headwall Great Ocean Roaddeveloped over the last five years with its own space-qualified sensor payloads.  There was also strong focus from attendees on how satellite collaboration could be established among the world’s most notable remote sensing programs.  Japan’s ALOS-3 (2016 launch?), European ENMAP (2017 launch?), and NASA HYSPIRI mission (2023 launch?) represent three of several.

Even with all the activity at IGARSS, Headwall’s remote sensing team led by Kevin Didona, Principal Engineer at Headwall, also took some hyperspectral scans of rock wall formations at some very scenic places along the Great Ocean Road on the South Coast of Australia.

As Headwall has developed extensive experience in the application of hyperspectral sensors specifically designed for UAVs, please drop us a line or give is a call if we can provide some information to meet the objectives of your remote sensing research.

Email us at [email protected]

Visit us at www.HeadwallPhotonics.com

Or call us at Tel: +1 978 353 4003


Tags: hyperspectral imaging, hyperspectral, Headwall Photonics, Airborne, Remote Sensing, Sensors, Micro Hyperspec, UAS, SWIR, Sensing, VNIR, Satellites, UAV

Remote Sensing: All Eyes on Munich

Posted by Christopher Van Veen on Fri, Jul 20, 2012

The IEEE is an esteemed organization with top-notch events held worldwide. These events draw experts from across industry, government and education.

One of these events is happening next week, in Munich, Germany. The IEEE's International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS) will probably see its biggest attendance ever, as the evolution of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) melds with needs of the remote sensing community. Headwall Photonics will be in booth #18.

IGARSS 2012Much of what scientists want to analyze is best done from above. This holds true for oceanography, atmospheric research, precision agriculture, minerals and mining, and forestry management. Now that commercial UAVs are becoming more affordable and regulations governing their use more ‘mainstream,’ the door is wide open for a fascinating amount of quality research helped along by these small, pilotless aircraft.

Hyperspectral sensors represent a highly desired piece of precision instrumentation carried aloft by UAVs. Why? Because they can extract a tremendous amount of data based on the spectral makeup of what is within the field of view. What the human eye—or even infrared—cannot see, hyperspectral sensors can. Small, lightweight, and extremely precise, Headwall’s Micro Hyperspec is favored for its ability to offer several attractive capabilities. First is its tall slit, which gives the sensor a wide field of view. The wider the field of view, the more precise the hyperspectral data is from a given altitude. Looking down Hyperspectral imaging from UAVsfrom above, UAVs can make fewer passes over a plot of land if the resolution to either side of the flight path is very wide. In short, more territory can be covered in less time.

Another highly desired characteristic is spatial and spectral resolution, which determines how faithful the hyperspectral data is. The beauty of a hyperspectral sensor is that it can delineate what it ‘sees’ with a tremendous degree of resolution. For example, higher resolution can mean the difference between simply distinguishing disease conditions and determining what those diseases are. Or, determining good soil conditions from bad.

While affordable UAVs are all the rage at present, the beauty of hyperspectral imaging is that instruments can be made small and rugged to fit specific payload requirements. 'Size, Weight & Power' (referred to as 'SWaP) describes the continuous desire to make payloads as small, lightweight, and as power-efficient as possible. These characteristics hold true for any airborne vehicle aside from a UAV, whether a fixed-wing aircraft, a high-altitude reconnaissance plane, or a satellite. Headwall Photonics has hyperspectral instruments deployed successfully in all these platforms.

 

 


Tags: hyperspectral imaging, hyperspectral, Headwall Photonics, Airborne, Remote Sensing, Sensors, Sensing, Satellites, UAV, agriculture

Satellite Hyperspectral Sensing Boosts Environmental Research

Posted by David Bannon on Wed, May 16, 2012

Last week, I participated in the bi-annual Earth Observation Business Network 2012 (EOBN) conference, a small group of industry leaders brought together in Vancouver, British Columbia and sponsored by MDA of Canada.  A tip of the hat to John Hornsby, MDA VP of GeoSpatial Strategies and his team, who hosted a very informative and interactive conference.

This year’s EOBN theme was "Operational Decision Making From Earth Observation." The conference featured application sessions from both government and industry leaders who addressed the tactical impact and requirements of satellite and airborne imagery. From aviation to land surveillance/intelligence to the Arctic and Antarctic, leading end-users and providers offered their unique perspective of capabilities and requirements for remote sensing and earth sciences.

It is clear that remote sensing capability is not only a critical and strategic capability for nations, but also for commercial satellite providers developing advanced data products and imaging services. The challenges of working within such harsh environments as the Arctic Circle – whether maritime transport or mineral exploration – require data products that are fused with satellite and spectral imagery.

Arctic Exploration

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Source: CBC

With our current ability to provide hyperspectral sensor payloads for small satellites covering the VNIR (380 -1000 nm) and SWIR (950 – 1000 nm), it is clear that Headwall will continue to play an expanding role in the development of remote sensing capabilities throughout the world.

Tags: hyperspectral imaging, Headwall Photonics, Airborne, Remote Sensing, SWIR, VNIR, Satellites