Headwall Photonics Blog

History Made, History Seen with Hyperspectral Imaging

Posted by David Bannon on Mon, Mar 03, 2014

As the market for hyperspectral sensing technology moves forward and advances, Headwall’s Application Engineering team has been able to gather a rare view into the past through the hyperspectral scanning of some of the most important historical artifacts and papers in the United States. For the first time ever, hyperspectral VNIR and SWIR imaging was conducted on key historical documents from the US Civil War period.

The Gettysburg AddressBy working collaboratively with the researchers in the Cornell University Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections and the Cornell Johnson Museum of Art, Janette Wilson and Kwok Wong of Headwall’s Application Engineering team spent a few days conducting VNIR and SWIR hyperspectral scans of some of the most important artifacts held by Cornell University. Of particular interest was the hyperspectral scanning of the University’s collection of original Lincoln documents signed by president Abraham Lincoln during his presidency. This collection included the Gettysburg Address (seen at left), the Emancipation Proclamation, and the 13th Amendment to the Constitution.

The scanning of documents and artifacts with hyperspectral imagers is particularly well suited for the purposes of both 1) research and 2) for establishing a baseline of spectral/spatial information for monitoring change in the artifacts to better preserve objects of cultural heritage.

For a couple main reasons, hyperspectral imaging is particularly appealing to collection-care experts. First, and probably most important, is that the technology is non-destructive. The instruments don't interface with the documents and the lighting is called 'cold illumination.' That is, there is no risk of themal damage to the items under inspection. Second, previously unseen features immediately 'come to light' when viewed hyperspectrally. Note the image below, which represents a stamp on the Gettysburg Address that cannot be seen visibly but can when looked at within the VNIR and SWIR spectral range. Collection-care experts are fascinated by unseen features, which can be used to build the body of knowledge with respect to documents or artifacts.

Unseen Features

Tags: hyperspectral, SWIR, VNIR, Cornell University, artifacts, documents, Gettysburg Address

Headwall Remote Sensing Capabilities Seen “Down Under”

Posted by David Bannon on Wed, Jul 31, 2013

melbourneThis past week, Headwall remote sensing team finished a productive week Down Under at the International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS) in Melbourne, Australia.  The conference, organized by the IEEE, comprises a ‘Who’s Who’ across the global remote sensing community. But curiously absent were representatives from the United States, probably reflecting the topic du jour: sequestration. Imagine holding a geo-spatial and remote sensing conference and no one from NASA was able to attend?

From an international perspective, we observed tremendous interest from customers looking to gain spectral capability for their manned aircraft and also surprising interest from organizations looking to buy “all-inclusive” UAV configurations that include the Micro-Hyperspec imaging spectrometer, a GPS/INS unit, a lightweight IGARSS 2013 Boothembedded processor, and an suite of application software. This complete airborne package was a big hit at IGARSS because while users have good grasp on the benefits of airborne hyperspectral, they need help making it work in particular application.  Two very nice UAVs on display at IGARSS created a lot of buzz in the Headwall booth. Although Headwall doesn’t make the UAV platform, we make them do some pretty amazing things within the realm of hyperspectral remote sensing. That message came through loud and clear, as our stand at IGARSS was phenomenally busy from the start right through the end.

A bit further up in altitude were visitors interested in hyperspectral remote sensing from space. A major point of interest throughout the conference was a demonstrated need for cost effective, space-qualified hyperspectral sensor payloads.  With most of the world’s planned remote sensing missions being delayed for budget reasons, VNIR (380-1000nm) and SWIR (900-2500nm) space-qualified imagers are hot commodities. This is an area that Headwall Great Ocean Roaddeveloped over the last five years with its own space-qualified sensor payloads.  There was also strong focus from attendees on how satellite collaboration could be established among the world’s most notable remote sensing programs.  Japan’s ALOS-3 (2016 launch?), European ENMAP (2017 launch?), and NASA HYSPIRI mission (2023 launch?) represent three of several.

Even with all the activity at IGARSS, Headwall’s remote sensing team led by Kevin Didona, Principal Engineer at Headwall, also took some hyperspectral scans of rock wall formations at some very scenic places along the Great Ocean Road on the South Coast of Australia.

As Headwall has developed extensive experience in the application of hyperspectral sensors specifically designed for UAVs, please drop us a line or give is a call if we can provide some information to meet the objectives of your remote sensing research.

Email us at [email protected]

Visit us at www.HeadwallPhotonics.com

Or call us at Tel: +1 978 353 4003


Tags: hyperspectral imaging, hyperspectral, Headwall Photonics, Airborne, Remote Sensing, Sensors, Micro Hyperspec, UAS, SWIR, Sensing, VNIR, Satellites, UAV

Hyperspectral Imaging - Next Generation Machine Vision Platform for Food Safety and Quality

Posted by David Bannon on Tue, Jun 26, 2012

Bosoon Park, author of this blog entry, works as an Agricultural Engineer on behalf of the USDA in Georgia. He has done extensive research on hyperspectral and Raman imaging as it applies to food inspection and agriculture. Author of numerous published papers on the subject, Bosoon will be co-presenting a discussion on hyperspectral imaging at the annual conference of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers to be held in Dallas July 30 through August 2.

USDA At USDA, our work revolves around making sure that the foods we harvest and eat are safe, high quality, and healthy. Our mission is twofold: ensuring and improving the safety of food and feed, and ensuring and improving the quality and economic value of food and crops.

There are very important inspection steps between ‘farm’ and ‘fork,and the USDA invests considerable time looking at new technologies that can help. Hyperspectral & Raman imaging (both imaging spectroscopy techniques) can provide valuable inspection data based on the chemical composition of agricultural products that traditional machine vision systems cannot provide. 

During the past decade, USDA has worked with companies such as Headwall Photonics to develop hyperspectral technologies for in-line food safety inspection. Our work focuses on contaminant detection during in-line processing, which the Hyperspec Inspector allows us to do. Our researchers are expanding hyperspectral imaging technology to rapidly detect foodborne pathogens at a microscopic level.  Hyperspectral imaging has tremendous potential for the food industry in terms of safety inspection and quality control by analyzing spatial and spectral characteristics of agricultural products.  We are also exploring handheld hyperspectral instruments fully integrated with operating software for field use.

Raman spectrometers will also detect foodborne pathogens since their scattering phenomena respond very well to particular laser-lighting sources. USDA researchers have proved the concept to identify bacterial species and foodborne bacterial serotypes with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This is an emerging area of focused research for improved food safety.

In an effort to educate and inform, several of us from USDA are preparing a short course on ‘hyperspectral imaging’ at the upcoming American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) conference July 30-August 2 in Dallas. Thanks to help from Headwall Photonics in commercializing and economizing the technology, we’re able to research and test hyperspectral and Raman instruments so that they can become mainstream across food-processing industries ranging from poultry to specialty crops.

Tags: hyperspectral imaging, hyperspectral, Sensors, SWIR, food processing, agriculture, Raman, USDA, plant phenotyping, Raman imaging

Satellite Hyperspectral Sensing Boosts Environmental Research

Posted by David Bannon on Wed, May 16, 2012

Last week, I participated in the bi-annual Earth Observation Business Network 2012 (EOBN) conference, a small group of industry leaders brought together in Vancouver, British Columbia and sponsored by MDA of Canada.  A tip of the hat to John Hornsby, MDA VP of GeoSpatial Strategies and his team, who hosted a very informative and interactive conference.

This year’s EOBN theme was "Operational Decision Making From Earth Observation." The conference featured application sessions from both government and industry leaders who addressed the tactical impact and requirements of satellite and airborne imagery. From aviation to land surveillance/intelligence to the Arctic and Antarctic, leading end-users and providers offered their unique perspective of capabilities and requirements for remote sensing and earth sciences.

It is clear that remote sensing capability is not only a critical and strategic capability for nations, but also for commercial satellite providers developing advanced data products and imaging services. The challenges of working within such harsh environments as the Arctic Circle – whether maritime transport or mineral exploration – require data products that are fused with satellite and spectral imagery.

Arctic Exploration

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Source: CBC

With our current ability to provide hyperspectral sensor payloads for small satellites covering the VNIR (380 -1000 nm) and SWIR (950 – 1000 nm), it is clear that Headwall will continue to play an expanding role in the development of remote sensing capabilities throughout the world.

Tags: hyperspectral imaging, Headwall Photonics, Airborne, Remote Sensing, SWIR, VNIR, Satellites

Small UAVs - Precision agriculture & hyperspectral remote sensing

Posted by David Bannon on Mon, Apr 09, 2012

Micro Hyperspec UAV Picture 2Offering improvements in agricultural yields and precision farming, hyperspectral sensors allow producers and processors to make the foods we eat safer along with providing the advantages of higher quality and hopefully, better taste.  Based in Massachusetts, Headwall Photonics, designs and manufactures small, lightweight sensors that are deployed aboard airborne platforms ranging from piloted aircraft to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). With experience developed within the military sector, the company has established quite a business enabling the commercial use of very small, cost-effective UAVs for remote sensing and agriculture applications.

In the same way that food-processing lines are evolving from straight-forward machine-vision systems to spectral imaging, many agriculturalists and food producers are moving beyond simple appearance and color measurement to more advanced hyperspectral imaging. The richness of the data collected offers farmers a sense of what to plant, where to plant, and when to harvest. High-value crops such as pecans, grapes, walnuts and others need to be managed with precision to yield a profitable harvest. Nutrient levels, ripeness, and disease conditions can be ‘seen’ by hyperspectral sensors based on the chemical “fingerprint” of the crops rather than on the visual appearance; thus offering the ability to implement cost-effective solutions early in the growth cycle of the harvest.

Since these imaging sensors can be and are rapidly being deployed aboard inexpensive UAVs, hundreds of acres can be surveyed and monitored very quickly. The data-processing power coupled to these hyperspectral sensors means that more actionable crop and agricultural information can be obtained. The result is better overall crop management across the farming and food production industries. Where famine relief is acute, airborne hyperspectral sensors quickly lead to better decisions about what crops to plant, where to plant them, and when to harvest them. The specific ‘spectral signatures’ of diseased plants, contaminants, and ripeness conditions mean that hyperspectral technology can clearly be used to ensure healthier foods for all and a more profitable and timely crop harvest.

As a previous topic, Headwall mentioned an important specialty crop in the United States being grape production and vineyard management. One of Headwall’s hyperspectral customers, VineView Scientific Aerial Imaging, is a company that uses high-resolution, scientifically calibrated data products to assist framers in crop uniformity optimization, irrigation management, and harvest planning. “Hyperspectral data allows us to provide more specific actionable information to our clients who manage high-value crops,” said Dr. Matthew Staid, President of Saint Helena, CA-based VineView. The Headwall airborne hyperspectral sensors can be mounted on small UAVs or manned aircraft and means that VineView cannot only map vigor or stress within crops but can better identify the specific causes of those stresses. 

Headwall continues to advance the agriculture and remote sensing industries through the deployment of cost-effective hyeprspectral sensors that have a positive impact on farmers, food processors, and agricultural research scientists around the world.

To speak with an application engineer, click here ...

Tags: hyperspectral imaging, Airborne, Remote Sensing, SWIR, agriculture